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American Students Stress More About Money, Per Rep...

American Students Stress More About Money, Per Report

Sodexo, a facilities management company for universities around the world, has released a report about students throughout different countries and their qualities of life. American students, per the report, stress about money more than students from other countries.

Surveys were given to students in the U.S., Spain, the U.K., Italy, India, and China. For American students, the most important factor in deciding on a university is if financial support is available. In Spain and Italy, the most important factor is if living at home is an option. In China, it is if the university has a campus, in India, it is if the university has a library and IT, and in the U.K., it is if the student had a good first impression from open days.

Though U.S. students are the most worried about money, students worldwide have saved money by skipping meals and not buying coursework, but the highest percentage in this category was not going out with friends. 53% of worldwide students said parents pay for their college, while just 17% pay for it themselves. And when it comes to quitting school, 35% of American students have considered dropping out, much higher than the 5% recorded by Chinese students.

In China, 67% of students say college is a good value for their money; compare this to 52% for Americans and just 29% for Spaniards. Globally, 47% believe college is a good value for their money. The financial stress placed on American students is in some way connected to our continually growing student loan debt, an issue that persists with no foreseeable solution. Our politicians must address this problem knowing that American students stress more about money for university than students anywhere else.

(Photo courtesy of Robot Light)

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About Dillon Dodson

I am a recent graduate of Middle Tennessee State University’s Music Business program who is looking to make it as a writer. Last year, I worked at Nashville Public Radio as a Digital Media Intern which sparked my interest in editorial writing and acquiring a soft, calming voice. Now, I write about music for Chunky Glasses and music and more for High Faluter. The picture you see of me is from Bonnaroo, and considering I live for music festivals this is how I usually look. If you want illuminating Instagram posts, serendipitous Spotify suggestions, and tantalizing tweets, follow me via the corresponding buttons below.


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